Will You Say Yes?

Recently, I shared a two-part Victory Call dealing with the topic of forgiveness.  One of the things I have learned over the years—and continue to learn—is this thing called forgiveness is a subject that cannot be discussed, pondered, written about or thought about too much.

You see, we are people, plain and simple people who by our very nature are prone to wander like sheep. Whether we like it or not life is happening all around us and the opportunities for our toes to get stepped on or our personal sensibilities to be slighted are truly endless.

None of us will ever be ever be able to rightly say, “I got this.” Why? Because we don’t got it and the moment we’re tempted to say so, to brag on it, would be sufficient proof that we don’t.

So, dear ones, what I’ll share with you today are the words of someone many of us know of from many years of listening to his broadcast radio ministry, Focus on the Family.

In actuality, it is the conclusion of the previous two-part VC wherein he wrote:

“I can’t imagine any situation or circumstance in which the obligation to forgive would be more difficult than the one Corrie faced. She had lived with routine murder, humiliation, cruelty, and starvation at the hands of the man who now faced her. Every natural impulse—every angry emotion—would cry out for revenge against her former tormentor. She still carried with her the images of her father, emaciated sister, and other family members who died at the hands of the Nazis. I wonder if I could have had the moral strength to forgive this guard and release the passion for revenge and retribution. Yet, Corrie ten Boom was able to do just that and thereby show the world what Jesus meant by His commandment to “turn the other cheek.”

Here’s the question of the hour: If Corrie ten Boom could forgive her captors—and if Jesus could forgive the Roman soldiers and you and me for killing Him on the cross—can’t we find it in our hearts to forgive the mistakes and hurtful actions of our imperfect mate? We absolutely must, or we’ll become pathetic invalids trapped by bitterness and hate.”- James C Dobson

Dear sisters, the question will always be the same. Will we choose to forgive? Will we seventy times seven say, “Yes, Lord, yes!”

Stephanie Dale

Stephanie D. Paul serves as part of the Addiction Recovery Team at America’s Keswick as Director of Women of Character. She has been married for over 30 years to Sesky Paul who is a graduate of the Colony of Mercy. They have two grown children.
Her single focus in ministry at Keswick is to image Christ in grace and truth to wounded and hurting women, encouraging them to make Jesus the truest Lover of their soul and the One in whom all hope lies.

https://www.biblegateway.com/devotionals/night-light

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