Sorrowful and Troubled

Matthew recorded the scene at a place called Gethsemane. Jesus, approaching the time of his death, took his disciples to this garden to pray. He said to them, “Sit here, while I go other there and pray.” (Mt. 26:36). Jesus left the majority of his disciples there and took Peter, James, and John and moved further into the garden. Matthew says Jesus “began to be sorrowful and troubled.” (Mt. 26:37).

Think about that.

Jesus.

God in the flesh.

Eternal deity.

Creator.

Jesus was sorrowful and troubled.

“Then he said to them, ‘My soul is very sorrowful, even to death; remain here and watch with me.'” (Mt. 26:38).

Jesus was very sorrowful.

Why?

Was he fearful? I would think any man would be if he knew what awaited him.

Matthew did not say Jesus was fearful and troubled.

No, he said Jesus was sorrowful and troubled.

What would it be?

What weighed so heavily on our Savior’s heart that night in the garden?

Could it have been that, within hours, the sin of men, the blackest, darkest, vilest sin, would be laid upon Him who had never known sin from eternity past?

In fact, Paul clearly states, “For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.” (2 Corinthians 6:21).

The Father “made him to be sin”… that sounds much more invasive than “our sin was laid upon him.”

I shudder to think of the reality of the cross. Not just the mechanics of crucifixion – what Jesus physically endured on my behalf but that Jesus – pure, perfect, undefiled, God — became my sin.

I don’t know for certain, but I can’t help but think that is why Jesus was sorrowful and troubled.
This scene at Gethsemane shows we that gaze upon it the blending of the deity, humanity, and humility of Christ.

Thank You, Jesus, sounds so trite in light of that.

Take time to gaze.
Blessings, Diane

Diane Hunt is a Biblical Counselor, Women’s conference and retreat speaker and author. She serves as the Director of Partner Care and Director of Women’s Ministries at America’s Keswick. She and her husband John have two married children and four grandchildren. She loves reveling in warm sunny climates and playing with her grandchildren.

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