The Trap of Worry

Every Wednesday, I receive a devotional blog titled, “Wednesday’s Word.” On a recent Wednesday the Word was “Worry.” The writer, Paul David Tripp says, “…even though the Bible predicts it, many Christians are unprepared for when suffering enters their door and how we will be tempted to question the goodness of our Lord.”

He goes on to say that, “In the middle of suffering, you will worry yourself about many things:
Why did this happen?
Could I have prevented it?
What will the outcome be?
Do I have what it takes to make it through?

“These questions are natural, and in many ways, they’re not wrong to ask. But it’s so easy to have your heart captivated with worry. You probably won’t find the answers right away, and you’ll panic as a mountain of worry-driven questions grows higher by the day.

Here’s the problem with worry – like doubt, it’s God-forgetful. Doubt forgets God’s goodness, and worry forgets His presence.”

Dear sisters, did you get that? He says to us that, “Doubt is God-forgetful.”

Oh how true this is. Nothing! Nothing at all can fill the believer with a greater sense of hopelessness, than when he or she forgets; forgets to remember God.

We have a sovereign, everywhere present, all the time God. Where are you that He is not? What weapon formed against you can prosper? If God be for you, who can be against you?

In his blog Paul Trip continues:
“Why did this happen? I don’t know, but God does.
Could I have prevented it? Maybe not, but God could have and chose not to.
What will the outcome be? I don’t know, but God does.
Do I have what it takes to make it through?
No, but God is with me every step of the way.
You see, worry assumes that it’s only you vs. suffering.
Worry finds a foothold in the lie that you’re alone in your suffering.
Meanwhile, the Lord names Himself Immanuel – ‘God with us.’

You are never alone in suffering. Worry will tell you that you need to carry the burden on your shoulders; Immanuel says, ‘I will carry it for you.’

When you fall into the trap of worry and believe that you’ve been abandoned by God, you won’t run to Him for help. But when you believe that God was, is, and always will be there for you, you can run into His loving arms and find rest. God bless.” Paul David Tripp

Stephanie P.

Stephanie serves as part of the Addiction Recovery Team at America’s Keswick as Director of Women’s Addiction Ministry. She has been married for almost 30 years to Sesky Paul who is a graduate of the Colony of Mercy. Stephanie serves alongside him as Care Group leaders in their church. They have two grown children.
Her single focus in ministry at Keswick is to image Christ in grace and truth to wounded and hurting women, encouraging them to make Jesus the truest Lover of their soul and the One in whom all hope lies.

Man of Sorrows

We have just passed Easter: Our Resurrection Day! For the stripes He bore, our Savior redeemed us for the just penalty our sin deserves. Halleluiah! What a Savior!

Man of Sorrows! What a name. For the Son of God, who came.
Ruined sinners to reclaim. Hallelujah! What a Savior!

Bearing shame and scoffing rude, in my place condemned He stood;
Sealed my pardon with His blood. Hallelujah! What a Savior!

Guilty, vile, and helpless we; spotless Lamb of God was He;
“Full atonement!” can it be? Hallelujah! What a Savior!

Lifted up was He to die; “It is finished!” was His cry;
Now in Heav’n exalted high. Hallelujah! What a Savior!

When He comes, our glorious King, all His ransomed home to bring,
Then anew His song we’ll sing: Hallelujah! What a Savior!

Philip P. Bliss: (July 9, 1838—December 29, 1876) wrote this famous hymn which I heard for the first time after being saved more than 20 years. This year I’ll celebrate my 37th spiritual birthday and this song “Halleluiah! What a Savior” is now one of my favorites.

As the religious and secular world celebrates this time of year their way, let us, as those who are called, redeemed, born-again, take time to reflect on the One to whom we owe our very lives and remember to honor Him in every possible way.

It is written:
“And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength. This is the first commandment.” Mark 12:30

Stephanie P.

Stephanie serves as part of the Addiction Recovery Team at America’s Keswick as Director of Women’s Addiction Ministry. She has been married for almost 30 years to Sesky Paul who is a graduate of the Colony of Mercy. Stephanie serves alongside him as Care Group leaders in their church. They have two grown children.
Her single focus in ministry at Keswick is to image Christ in grace and truth to wounded and hurting women, encouraging them to make Jesus the truest Lover of their soul and the One in whom all hope lies.

Lord Haste the Day

“And Lord, haste the day when the faith shall be sight,
the clouds be rolled back as a scroll;
the trump shall resound, and the Lord shall descend…”

Have you ever had a “Lord haste the day” kind of day? One of those days when, for no specific reason, you’re just tired — tired of it all; weary of man’s total depravity and all the forms it takes?

Konner Dudley, “a rescued sinner with a servant complex” writes: “I rarely get to the end of ‘It is Well’ without tearing up a bit. These songs strike something deep in my bones. As I sing the words I can feel the angst in living on this side of Heaven. I truly experience the words of Paul when he says, “…we ourselves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies.”

The day is coming folks when we will stand (or fall on our faces, I really don’t know) fully enveloped in the presence of God, the creator and sustainer of all things.

When that day beckons, “God will wipe away every tear from [our] eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.”

We will be with Jesus. WE WILL BE WITH JESUS.

How about you? Are you longing for heaven? Or is your heart and mind set on earth?

I remember a conversation I had with a dear young adult who told me she didn’t want to die and go to heaven before she’d experienced marriage, child-birth, graduations…etc., etc., etc.

If God called us home today, would ask Him to wait?

Konner continues: “Why, with the knowledge of God’s promises for peace, eternal life, and his unending presence do I value this life so greatly?

Paul had a noble reason when he wrote his letter to the Philippian church. To remain alive for him meant fruitful labor, as in winning souls to Christ and nourishing them to genuine faith. Yet he also mentions that to die and thus depart to the Lord would be immeasurable gain.

Like the young person I was speaking to Konner had his reasons: I desire for Christ to come and take me, yet I’d prefer to live my life first.

As for me, a young 55, I want to sing: “What a glorious day that will be” as if I desired for it to happen today. There is no greater treasure than the Lord. I don’t want to “live my best life now.” My best life will be when I’m fully glorified in Christ. For now I pray: Remind me of your unsurpassable worth and enable me to serve you faithfully and well for the rest of my days. Amen.

Stephanie P.

Stephanie serves as part of the Addiction Recovery Team at America’s Keswick as Director of Women’s Addiction Ministry. She has been married for almost 30 years to Sesky Paul who is a graduate of the Colony of Mercy. Stephanie serves alongside him as Care Group leaders in their church. They have two grown children.
Her single focus in ministry at Keswick is to image Christ in grace and truth to wounded and hurting women, encouraging them to make Jesus the truest Lover of their soul and the One in whom all hope lies.

Biblegateway.com
ibid

http://konnerdudley.com/2014/03/28/lord-haste-the-day/

A Keeper

Behold, He who keeps Israel Shall neither slumber nor sleep. The LORD is your keeper;
The LORD is your shade at your right hand
. Psalm 121:4-5

A single mother of two young children has some serious challenges ahead of her. Both children are hers but of different fathers. Neither of which keeps her or them. However, she does work hard and has a very supportive family.  Her father helps provide for them, meeting many of their needs, financially and emotionally. Without a doubt, mom has made some life choices that weren’t the best for her or the children. Nevertheless, she is learning and seems to be making better choices as she has opportunity.

Someone made the comment that, because she is helped by her family, she is “kept.” Well, let’s unpack that for a minute. She may not be the Lone Ranger, but she’s not supposed to be is she? Isn’t that what family is supposed to do? I’m not talking about enabling. I’m talking about help, direction, support, counsel, assistance, not a life-style, but a life-line. I applaud her earthly father for his faithfulness during a time when he may have wished she had made better initial choices. The fact remains, he can help without enabling and, by God’s grace, he should.

We may feel very self-sufficient, all safe and sound in our homes, cars, churches and jobs. But the truth is, and we’ve seen it happen, that could all be swept away in a moment. Today the hand that gave a drink to the needy could tomorrow be the hand that accepts it.

The truth is, we are all “kept” by He who keeps Israel.

Dina S.

Saving Face

In 1 Samuel 15 we see Saul being given another opportunity to show himself right before the Lord. If we look closely we see Saul putting on a good face. He is disobedient (vs 9), a liar (vs 21) and argumentative (vs 16-25). Instead of confessing, he blames. Instead of being found right with the Lord, he desires to look good in front of the people (vs 30). He is only concerned with how he looks.

Last week I had the opportunity to hear from a pastor who humbly admitted to an anger issue in his life. It seems that his anger went unnoticed or ignored by himself for years.  But then he was confronted with it and after many years of service he repented privately and publicly. He too could have kept a good face on, blamed others, and pointed fingers away from himself. What changed him? The willingness to be right with his God and to know that nothing hindered their relationship.

In Saul we are reminded that we, too, need to be more concerned with facing our God with clean hands rather than pleasing those around us. We see in a number of instances that Saul’s heart had rejected the Word of God.

As this pastor shared his story and continued his teaching he encouraged all of us to reflect. Reflect on motives. Reflect on actions. Reflect on our priorities and where our hearts are with Jesus.

I would like to encourage you to reflect too. We will be looking at God’s choice for a king – David- in the next chapter. As you reflect I would ask, “Is yours a heart that is after God’s heart?”

May it be that we would say “Yes!”

Blessings, Kathy

Kathy’s on staff at America’s Keswick in the Development Department. Kathy has been married to her husband Dave for 28 years.  They have two adult children. Kathy is active in her local Church and has taught Sunday School and Bible Studies for women. Her passion is to encourage women to deepen their walk with Jesus Christ by finding and living out the truths of God’s Word.

 

Pray for One Another

The effective, fervent prayer of a righteous man avails much. James 5:16

A dear friend recently attended a ladies retreat. She was challenged to ask people to pray each day for two requests for the next month. I was honored to be asked to stand in prayer with my friend for her two requests. In just the first week we have seen some answers to one of the requests. The other request is a bit more long-term but we know God is moving. As I think about praying for one another I am challenged, first of all, to keep my commitment to pray and secondly, to be mindful to look for the way God is working.

I received a text from this friend one morning with the challedge to watch for a God sighting that day. I watched…for maybe a half hour…then got caught up in the day. How much do we miss because we will not pray and we will not watch?

We can all do better. Will you join me in praying and watching more intentionally?

Blessings,
Kathy

Kathy’s on staff at America’s Keswick in the Development Department. Kathy has been married to her husband Dave for 28 years.  They have two adult children. Kathy is active in her local Church and has taught Sunday School and Bible Studies for women. Her passion is to encourage women to deepen their walk with Jesus Christ by finding and living out the truths of God’s Word.

 

It’s Just a Game

On Facebook I found myself part of a game for Breast Cancer Awareness. I didn’t want to play because some of the things you were asked to post were a bit much. I can’t even tell you why I picked the post of least offense and posted it. But it didn’t sit with me so I ended up deleting it. I began to feel think, “what were you thinking?” and obviously, I was not! We think some things are so little they can’t possibly count. We think we can play but we ought to flee! We think it’s just a game but it reveals something about us that isn’t always pretty. I knew I should not have posted yet I did…..and I regretted it!

Today would you and I be more mindful of the little things we “play” with? It doesn’t take much to get tripped up and find ourselves playing a game that we have no part in.

O Be Careful Little Eyes
O be careful little eyes what you see
O be careful little eyes what you see
There’s a Father up above
And He’s looking down in love
So, be careful little eyes what you see

O be careful little ears what you hear
O be careful little ears what you hear
There’s a Father up above
And He’s looking down in love
So, be careful little ears what you hear

O be careful little hands what you do
O be careful little hands what you do
There’s a Father up above
And He’s looking down in love
So, be careful little hands what you do

O be careful little feet where you go
O be careful little feet where you go
There’s a Father up above
And He’s looking down in love
So, be careful little feet where you go

O be careful little mouth what you say
O be careful little mouth what you say
There’s a Father up above
And He’s looking down in love
So, be careful little mouth what you say

Blessings,
Kathy

 

Kathy’s on staff at America’s Keswick in the Development Department. Kathy has been married to her husband Dave for 28 years.  They have two adult children. Kathy is active in her local Church and has taught Sunday School and Bible Studies for women. Her passion is to encourage women to deepen their walk with Jesus Christ by finding and living out the truths of God’s Word.